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i_mBODY Lab

Interactive Multisensory Body-centred Experiences
at the Intersection of Neuroscience & Technology

MH. Rahmani

Mohammad (MH) Rahmani is a PhD research candidate in Computer Science and Technology at UC3M, currently focusing on Embodied Perception through Interaction and Sensations.

Karunya Srinivasan

Karunya Srinivasan has a multidisciplinary background in Psychology, Expressive Arts Therapy, Somatic Education and Cognitive Science. Her studies and work have followed her belief that it is in movement where the body finds its meaning.

Seeing (a pre-registered protocol) is believing, Miguel A. Vadillo, Associate Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Director of the Cognition, Attention, and Learning Lab (CALL)

Date: 2024-05-07, 14:00h UTC+2

Speaker: Miguel A. Vadillo, Associate Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Director of the Cognition, Attention, and Learning Lab (CALL)

Title: Seeing (a pre-registered protocol) is believing

Abstract: 
How much confidence should you put on a particular hypothesis if p < .05? From a rational point of view, the credibility of a scientific finding depends on three parameters: a) the prior likelihood of the hypothesis being true, b) the probability of a significant result if the alternative hypothesis is true, and c) the probability of a significant result if the null hypothesis is true. Unfortunately, (a) is largely subjective. (b) and (c) cannot be properly estimated with the information typically reported in scientific papers, but meta-scientific studies suggest that there are reasons to be pessimistic. Psychological research is often underpowered, which means that (b) is too low, and everything suggests that many significant findings could be the result of questionable research practices, casting doubt on (c). When we read a non-registered study, we can never know if the result is reliable or if the data were simply “tortured until they confessed”. The crucial contribution of pre-registration is that it ensures that the false positive rate is not inflated by questionable research practices or selective reporting. Furthermore, pre-registration forces researchers to plan their sample size based on a formal power analysis, ensuring that (b) is sufficiently large. As a result, in this talk I will defend that it is logical to put more faith in pre-registered studies than in non-registered research. Although non-registered research is not without value, pre-registration is definitely worthwhile.

Biography:
Miguel Vadillo is associate professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, where he coordinates the Cognition, Attention, and Learning Lab (CALL). He is also the current president of the Spanish Society for Experimental Psychology, member of the ethical review board at UAM, and member of the scientific committee of the National Research Agency. His research is focused on statistical problems in research on implicit learning and other unconscious mental processes and also on meta-analytic methods for the detection of biases in scientific research.
https://mvadillo.com/

Feeling and Perceiving with New Sensory Languages, Yeseul Song, Assistant Arts Professor at New York University Tisch School of the Arts’ Interactive Telecommunications Program / Interactive Media Art

Photo of Yeseul Song

Date: April 24th, 2024, 16:00h UTC+2

Speaker: Yeseul Song, Assistant Arts Professor at NYU ITP/IMA (New York University Tisch School of the Arts’ Interactive Telecommunications Program / Interactive Media Arts)

Title: Feeling and Perceiving with New Sensory Languages

Abstract:
Can you trust something that you can’t see? When an object does not have a form but is perceivable, does that object “exist”? How can we collectively perceive something that exists in-between our bodies?

The current technoculture relies heavily on vision, and the dominance has become even stronger with the advent of screen-based digital technologies. On the other hand, our vision is limited—sighted humans can only see a sliver of the whole electromagnetic spectrum (wavelengths from about 390 to 700 nm) and most of the waves around us including radio waves, microwaves, X-rays, and “energy” are completely invisible to the human eye. What are we missing when seeing becomes our foremost sense in how we are perceiving the world

Since 2018, Yeseul Song has been studying the negative space of visual senses and creating artistic non-visual sensory languages that are imaginative and accessible. Based on her research on technology and perception, she has created interactive artwork that inspired people from all over the world. To name a couple, Invisible Sculptures (2018-2021) is a series of sculptures that can be “seen” through senses other than vision. Two Subtle Bodies (2022) is an interactive auditory experience where two strangers experience each other’s peripersonal space through the sound. In this talk, she will share her artistic research in hybrid and alternative ways of feeling and perceiving.

Both sides of the mirror, the self as other and the other as a self, Marte Roel Lesur Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

Date: 14/02/24, 15:00
Speaker: Marte Roel Lesur, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
Title: Both sides of the mirror, the self as other and the other as a self
Abstract: In a medieval fable, the sun goes on a journey to find its source. The moon is left weeping without her lover’s warm gaze. The sun’s identity, devotedly offered in the mirror of moonlight, is sought elsewhere. Indeed mirrors, once among alchemists’ best guarded secrets, have carried powerful capacities since antiquity. One’s reflection is a window into how others perceive us: a rupture between ourselves as subject and object of experience. In this survey, mirrors become an allegory for the complexities of selfhood. From the lenses of psychology, neuroscience, art, and technology, the multisensory dimensions of the internal, the external, and the mutual, are delved into. From obsidian relics to dark magic algorithms capturing one’s essence to render immersive mirages, we will take a walk into the obscure space beyond our reflection.

Does voluntary auditory spatial attention exist in depth plane?, Kiichi Naka,Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Date: 29 January 2024
Speaker: Kiichi Naka,Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, Japan

Title: Does voluntary auditory spatial attention exist in depth plane?

Abstract:

We hear our surroundings in everyday life. From the surroundings where various sounds are, we voluntarily control selective attention to sounds, that is endogenous auditory spatial attention, to achieve our current goals. Many researchers have reported nature of endogenous auditory spatial attention in a horizontal plane, however, there is little research focusing on a depth plane in endogenous auditory spatial attention.
In this seminar, I mainly discuss the existence of endogenous auditory spatial attention in the depth plane. I show an experimental result that indicates we can control auditory spatial attention in the depth plane. Moreover, the potential for the application of auditory spatial attention characteristics in the depth plane is mentioned.

Perception of extra body parts & body part weight. Denise Cadete, PhD student at the Body Representation Lab, Birkbeck University of London

Date: 22 November 2023

Speaker: Denise Cadete, PhD student at the Body Representation Lab, Birkbeck University of London
Title: Perception of extra body parts & body part weight

Abstract: In everyday life, we have a constant and reliable experience of our own bodies. However, the perception of our body can be instantly altered using multisensory illusions or Virtual Reality. This flexibility is not restricted to the human body configuration, with recent studies showing we can also feel extra body parts. In the first part of the presentation, I will present the six finger illusion and what our findings tell us about how supernumerary body parts are represented in the brain. We will make a case for the independence and flexibility of how we represent extra body parts, also aiming to determine what are its limits.
In the second part, I will introduce our studies looking into how we perceive the weight of body parts. Perception of object’s weight has been studied for over a century, however little is known about weight perception of body parts. A recent study of our lab showed that we systematically and dramatically underestimate hand weight by 49% (Ferrè et al., 2023), an effect we called weightedness, for how light we experience body parts, on Earth. We further investigated how perceived hand size changed felt hand weight, and in another study we looked at perceived hand volume. We will propose a model of constant density in the perception of body part weight.

The Gender Perspective in Tech Research, Lídia Arroyo Prieto, Gender and ICT Research Group, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)

Date: 25 October 2023
Speaker: Lídia Arroyo Prieto, Gender and ICT Research Group, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)

Title: The Gender Perspective in Tech Research
Abstract: The seminar have the goal to introduce the key issues on the incorporation of the gender perspective in tech research. It is also an invitation to the interdisciplinar dialogue between social science and technological and nature science.
Biography:
Lídia Arroyo is a researcher at Gender and ICT Research Group (Internet Interdisciplinary Institute- Open University of Catalonia) and she is also an Associate Professor at Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB). She is the Principal Researcher of the project “Open Data Portal & Research on the incidence of occupational segregation on COVID-19 prevalence from a gender gender intersectional approach”. and she has coordinated the transnational study “Skills and Organizational Elements for Social Digital Inovation” from +RESILIENT project. She is also involved as a researcher in European projects on gender and science (GenPORT, ACT, EFFORTI). She has been a visiting research fellow at Área de Género, Sociedad y Políticas (FLACSO-Argentina) and the Fondation Travail-Univeristé (FTU-Namur)- Unversity of Namur (Belgium). Her researches, based on mixed methods, focus on gender, work and ICT and prevention of gender violence in young people. In 2011, she was awarded the Young Sociologist Prize from the Associació Catalana de Sociologia- Institut d’Estudis Catalans. Currently, she is the representative of data group of the Gender Equality Observatory (Generalitat de Catalunya). Community Manager of the following EU Projects GenPORT (https://twitter.com/GenderPORTal), ACT (https://twitter.com/ACTonGender) and CASPER (https://twitter.com/CasperGender).